Supply Chain Planning Blog

Supply Chain Planning for South Africa's Largest Processor of Chicken: News Release

Posted by kameron hadavi on Tue, May 03, 2011


Supply Chain Planning for FoodLos Angeles, CA, May 3, 2011—Adexa, Inc., the global provider of Supply Chain Planning and Demand Planning solutions, announced today that Rainbow Farms (Pty) Ltd, South Africa’s largest processor and marketer of chicken, has selected Adexa as its supply chain solution provider.  The first module, Adexa’s Collaborative Demand Planner will be implemented at Rainbow and Vector Logistics, one of the country's major 3rd-party logistics service providers for the CPG/food industry, and also for Rainbow.

The management teams of both companies are determined to improve and automate their joint Sales and Operations planning processes.   The goals of the project include reduction and optimization of inventories throughout the supply chain network, and creating a fully collaborative platform that drives the supply chain through more accurate and intelligent customer forecasts.  

“We want to make better use of our infrastructure, reduce inventory and working capital, and further improve on our high standards of customer service,” said Chris Creed, Managing Director for Vector Logistics.  “To that end, we needed collaborative tools to get closer to our customers, and more advanced planning systems for production and profit planning.  Tools provided by our own ERP system, and the spreadsheets, did not take us nearly far enough, but Adexa will.”

“Rainbow and Vector are very important and strategic customers to Adexa,” said Cyrus Hadavi, Adexa’s CEO.  “As a result of their selection, we have established new sales and support channels, in partnership with Sizwe Africa Business Consulting, to better serve them and our upcoming customers in that region.”

About Rainbow Chicken and Vector Logistics  

Rainbow Farms (Pty) Ltd, is South Africa’s largest processor and marketer of chicken.  Vector Logistics (Pty) Ltd, a division of Rainbow, is a specialist third-party logistics service provider (3pl) for the food and food-related industries within southern Africa across the retail, wholesale and food service sectors.  Visit: www.rainbowchickens.co.za and www.vectorlog.com

For more informaiton contact:

Ron Wilson

Marketing Director

888-300-7692 (Ext. 3)

rwilson@adexa.com

 

South African partner:

Richard Harris

Director, Sizwe Africa Business Consulting

+27 82 805 3360

Richard.harris@sizweafrica.co.za

Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, 3pl Logistics, Food Industry, S&OP

When should I ignore the customers when planning my supply chain?

Posted by kameron hadavi on Wed, Apr 06, 2011

Supply Chain PlanningThe first answer for most people is:  “never”.  So, lets put this in context, we are not asking if you should totally ignore your customers’ demand and market signals; we are really asking how important is it to track and consider individual customer demands/orders when planning your supply chain?

If you are a  business-to-consumer enterprise, the individual demands do not really impact your supply decisions.  For example, giant consumer product companies (from TV to toothpaste) do not track the individual orders when planning supply.  They are all aggregated up to a total demand for a product.  To that end,  this aggregated-planning approach is ubiquitous in the CPG industry, which has high volumes and low variety of consumer products.  For these industries, it is sufficient to aggregate all the end item demand into a total, and then net the total demand from the on-hand inventory, one period at a time.  The required production, or distribution, is calculated to make up for the predicted deficit.  That production quantity goes through a Bill-of-Materials Explosion (or the equivalent DRP calculation) and the dependent demand is used to do the same calculation on the next level of the BOM.  Devised in the mid 1980’s, this CPG logic is the dominant logic used by most supply chain planning systems, today.   Of course, each company has its own variations on how to handle capacity and material constraints, or includes an LP (Linear Programing) engine to optimize on cost, but the basics of the logic are all the same--they all lose visibility to individual customer demands when planning. 

How about turning the question around, when is it not OK to ignore customers when planning your supply chain?  When does a company need to look for a different logic in their planning system, than the typical CPG logic described above?  The answer is when you have critical constraints in your supply chain that cause you to have to stop treating all customers, and the associated demands, in exactly the same manner.  This comes into play when you need your planning system to help you figure out what orders should get critical capacity, special priority, or materials that are in short supply.  Examples of this are contractor capacity that is used to make multiple products, but is in short supply.  Another example is a critical common component that goes into multiple products.  The need to have visibility into orders when planning also comes into play when customer specifications require dependent levels of the BOM to be processed differently from each other.  An example of this is “date-code” considerations, or qualifications for specific manufacturing locations.  In each of these cases, the identity of the order and its attributes are important while planning it.   

In conclusion, when looking for a new supply chain planning systems (like for demand planning, inventory planning, S&OP, etc.), a company should do the simple check outlined above and decide if traditional CPG logic used in most planning systems today is sufficient to handle their requirements.   Given today’s savvy customers and their complex needs, many enterprises opt for much greater demand visibility and attribute based planning systems. 

To learn more about this topic download this ePaper: Attribute-Based Planning: How To Avoid Commoditization.  

Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Order Fulfillment, Order Planning

Monolithic Power Systems Plans With Adexa: News Release

Posted by kameron hadavi on Wed, Apr 06, 2011

Monolithic Power SystemsApril 7, 2011-- Adexa announced today Monolithic Power Systems, a high performance fabless semiconductor company, has selected and are implementing Adexa’s supply chain planning, and demand planning solutions. 

 “Our product portfolio has grown to hundreds of diverse products for worldwide customers, and we interact with multiple Foundries, Assembly and Testing sites.  We turned to advanced information technology solutions to further optimize the whole demand and supply planning process, and to ultimately better service our customers,” stated CEO, Michael Hsing, of Monolithic Power Systems.  

With deployment of the new systems, Monolithic Power Systems expects to further improve visibility, accuracy, and performance optimization in its supply chain, while enhancing collaboration across multiple business units.

“We selected Adexa through a long RFP process involving multiple leading vendors.  Adexa demonstrated very strong expertise in our industry and system implementation, and overall commitment to their customers”, added Dr. Henry Zhao, Director of Global IT of Monolithic Power Systems.

“Semiconductors has always been a big focus for us,” said Cyrus Hadavi, Adexa CEO.  “In the past year we have been seeing strong demand for our planning solutions from the Fabless side of the industry.  We are glad to see this trend continuing into this year as Monolithic Power Systems is being welcomed into our customer base."  

For more information about challenges and planning solutions for the fabless industry, download this ePaper: Overcoming The Shortcomings Of Fabless Planning Systems 

 

About Monolithic Power Systems, Inc.

Monolithic Power Systems (MPS) is a high performance analog semiconductor company headquartered in San Jose, California. Formed in 1997, the company has three core strengths; deep system-level and applications knowledge, strong analog design expertise, and an innovative proprietary process technology. These combined advantages enable MPS to deliver highly integrated monolithic products that offer energy efficient, cost-effective solutions.  Visit: www.monolithicpower.com

Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Fabless, Semiconductor

Planning Proliferation Of Products In A Fabless World

Posted by kameron hadavi on Wed, Oct 13, 2010

Semiconductor Supply Chain Palnning“Complex” is the common word we hear from many of our Fabless Semiconductor customers in describing their supply chains.  We talked a bit about that in our last blog posting entitled: Fabless Semiconductor Planning: Between a-rock-and a-Hard-place!  In this article, I want to touch on another culprit in complexity of a Fabless enterprises (or Semiconductors in general), proliferation of products

It’s no secrete that Fabless supply chain are faced with ever increasing number of products, and with that comes a lot more part#’s.   It’s one thing to deal with 3 products, and another thing to deal with 30.  The part#’s involved increases exponentially with every end-product.  Imagine this, in most cases our fabless customers are dealing with 100’s of end-products.  This makes crunching through the numbers for a supply chain “plan” very difficult and slow.  Remember, in planning the entire supply chain, these part#’s have to be used for demand planning (when the customers order it), operations planning (how to build it), inventory planning (what to keep on hand), and Supply planning (which suppliers to use and when).   The level of complexity is mind-boggling.

One of the new trends in dealing with this level of complexity is through Attribute Based Planning.  We have written a lot about this in the past but it seems like our readers can’t get enough of it, and for good reason--it works.  Attributes really simplify modeling the entire supply chain by utilizing the “characteristics” of products to describe them, rather than using unique part#.  For example, you may have a grade A, B, and C chips, at speeds of 1.66Ghz, 2.66Ghz, and 3.0Ghz.  You can give all 9 potential combinations a unique product name, or you can have only 3 product names by referring to the attributes of (Grade + Speed).  This is a very simple example, but you can learn a lot more about this by either reading the Attribute Based Planning ePaper or watching the “What is Attribute Based Planning” video on the Supply Chain Planning Channel

You can apply attributes to all levels of planning but there is a catch--your planning system has to be able to handle attributes for the process its intended for.  For example, for Demand Planning, the customer orders have to be described by their attributes within the system.  For Production planning, the product routes have to defined by attributes within the same system, and so on.  Basically, the entire logic and algorithms of your planning system has to be attribute-based, or you are stock with the unique part#’s. 

For fabless companies, who deal with massive product proliferations, attributes will make life a lot easier on your many planners.  They get to collaborate together much faster, and avoid a lot of clutter.   Below, see how Silicon Laboratories is using attributes in their planning environment.  Also, For more information on this topic download: Overcoming The Shortcomings Of Fabless Planning Systems ePaper.

 

Kameron HadaviAbout the Author:  Kameron Hadavi is the Vice President of Marketing & Alliances at Adexa, for more information about him please click here.

Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Attribute Based Planning, Fabless, Attributes, Semiconductor

Fabless Semiconductor Planning: Between A-Rock-And-A-Hard-Place!

Posted by kameron hadavi on Tue, Oct 12, 2010
Fabless Semiconductor PlanningMost fabless semiconductor companies are stuck between a rock-and-a-hard-place.  On one end, they have big customers demanding what they want, when they want it; and on the other end, they have big suppliers manufacturing their products—some 16 time zones away.    Synchronizing and managing capacities and deliveries through a complex supply chain like this cannot be easy.  Compounding the complexity is the short life-cycle of such products and the long manufacturing lead-times through outsourced Fabs.  With every new product, you basically have to revamp a good part of your supply chain, quickly.    The common theme to all of these challenges is time and uncertainty

Now let’s break the time and uncertainty factors down to their components.  When it comes to manufacturing anything, there is always a Planning cycle-time, and a Manufacturing cycle-time.  The latter, is the pure production time it takes to manufacture a product.  Fabless companies don’t control the manufacturing lead-time, since all of their production is outsourced.  However, they do have the opportunity to manage the suppliers’ capacity that is committed to them—which becomes part of the Planning cycle-time.  They also have to worry about the uncertainty of what they will order with the amount of capacity that they have been promised.  This makes the Planning cycle-time, and accuracy of the plan, twice as important to a fabless enterprise.   Planning cycle-time, is the amount of time a company needs to plan, react, and/or rollout a new plan based on market demand, inventory positions, and supplier capacity commitments.  Its reduction translates into less uncertainty and increased accuracy.  To that end, reducing planning cycle-times is a colossal competitive factor in this market.  Imagine cutting weeks out of your planning lead-times, which would directly impact your customer service, market share, and competitive positioning—amongst other things.  

How can you battle time by achieving shorter lead-times?  Or in terms of fabless, how can you reduce your Planning cycle times and increase plan accuracy?  Before I answer that, let me ask you a question, how can a manufacturer produce goods faster?  The simple answer is: better technology, and faster machines.  The same thing goes for planning systems.  If you want to fundamentally do it faster then you will need a new technology that can help you plan faster, collaborate more, and give you more visibility, thereby enabling better plans.  There are many processes that need to have faster planning times such as demand planning, operations planning, inventory optimization, and of course supply planning.  In picking the right system for your enterprise make sure you consider all these processes and how well the system adheres to your supply chain.   After all what’s the use of faster delivery times, if your inventories and cost is going through the roof.   

Adexa is one of the providers of such technologies and systems, with a great deal of focus on the fabless industry.   Below, one of our fabless customers talks about how they are using our systems to deal with fabless industry's tough challenges.   Also, For more information on this topic download: Overcoming The Shortcomings Of Fabless Planning Systems ePaper.

Kameron HadaviAbout the Author:  Kameron Hadavi is the Vice President of Marketing & Alliances at Adexa, for more information about him please click here.

Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, Fabless, Operations Planning, Cycle time, Semiconductor

Multi Echelon Inventory Planning Demystified!

Posted by Cyrus Hadavi on Fri, Apr 16, 2010
 

Inventory PlanningInventory is a very interesting phenomenon! You never know exactly how much you need until you actually need it or you know you have excess until it is too late! The major problem, or should I say opportunity, is that inventory is a function of both time and randomness. Randomness has to do with your competitors pricing, quality, weather, economy, acts of God, contagious disease, strikes, etc.  All of these factors and many others have an impact on your demand. For example Toyota's quality problems lead to increase in demand for other auto makers, warm weather increases demand on beer, N1H1 outbreak increased the demand for certain type of medication.

So you ask yourself, how often do we have such events and should I care? The answer is Yes! Because the weather maybe more predictable than your competitor and your customers' forecast!  In other words, it is very hard to tell how your competitors are going to change the game and take market share from you, or how your customers can change the demand based on how they feel and market conditions. So it is a constant game of balance between Supply and Demand. If you play the game long enough then you should become an expert.   Just like chess you can develop strategies to make the right move and be prepared no matter what your competitor does or what the changes in demand are. Being prepared is what the science of inventory planning is all about. We refer to this as Inventory Optimization. It allows you to decide how much inventory is enough, where and when. The two factors that you need to be concerned about are Cost and Service Level. On one hand you can have every possible item available in Finished Goods which is inconceivable. Or keep no inventory, another unlikely scenario. People talk about "zero" inventory; I am not sure what this means?  Does it imply that every time I want to buy a note book, somebody needs to go out and chop a small tree down and put it through the paper mill?  But one thing is for sure, your optimized inventory level is some place between those two points.

Inventory planners, like any other type of planners, need to have their slide rule (some of you may not be as old as me to know what these are!) or their calculators, to figure out where and when they should keep inventory up and down the supply chain. This is a very complex problem even without the randomness that we talked about. There are many different products each with their own Bill-of-Material and different production routings and capacity requirements. Shared resources and inventory buffers, as well as raw materials, are needed to build and store intermediate products at different stages of production. Very often subcontractors, distribution centers, consignment locations, and hubs are also part of the equation. I think you all agree that spreadsheets are too simple and rigid to do the job even-though it is of the most widespread tools. Now let's add randomness and seasonality to this. Are we having fun or what?

Here is the good news, an MEIO (Multi echelon Inventory Optimization) system is designed to be the tool that inventory planners need to deal with exactly the kind of problems that we just talked about. It has the capability to model different layers of supply chain, take randomness into account at every stage, look at the cost and service level requirements, and then come up with how much of what needs to be kept at every critical point of the supply chain. And if you don't like what it proposes, you can change the parameters and run it again and it will give you other alternatives so that you can make a wise decision. Think of it like what a structural engineer does when she designs a high-rise. The load at every floor can be different, the structure may have to be resistant to winds of up to 60 miles an hour, and there might be earthquake and fire hazards to consider.  Given all these potential "random" events the structure needs to deliver certain level of safety (i.e. service level) to its residents. The optimization programs that Structural engineers use resembles very much the MEIO system that we described above. It shows you how to build a supply chain that can be resistant to changes at lowest cost. The only difference is that in our building analogy you do it once, hoping that it will last forever.  However, using an MEIO system, you have the opportunity to re-design your inventory plan on weekly or monthly basis so that your supply chain can withstand new conditions. That is the beauty of a system which allows you to have enough flexibility to change with your demand, business conditions, management objectives, and moves of your competitors!

Multi Echelon Inventory Optimization systems are fairly new in the market but picking up a lot of momentum by helping to solve a common and complex supply chain problem--as Demand Planning systems did starting a decade ago.  The right MEIO solution can make your supply chain a lot more efficient, save a bunch of money, and most important of all make your customers very happy.

We have a comperhensive ePaper on this topic, just click on: Demystifying MEIO.

 

Cyrus HadaviDr. K. Cyrus Hadavi is the president and CEO of Adexa, for more information about the author please click here.  

 

 

For more information about different types of Supply Chain Planning systems visit: Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, or Sales and Operations Planning.

Topics: Multi Echelon Inventory Optimization, Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, MEIO, Inventory Management System, Finished Goods, Inventory Optimization

Supply Chain Inventory: Good or Evil?

Posted by Cyrus Hadavi on Mon, Mar 15, 2010
Inventory Planning What do all manufacturing companies, regardless of industry, have in common? Inventory! It's the lifeline of every company that sells goods. How can it be evil?

Inventory to a supply chain is like water to people. Too much of it would drown you. Too little makes you dysfunctional. So how much is enough? Just as in people, the real question is how fast are you running? Hence, the amount of inventory you need has to do with how fast you can move it. In addition to knowing how much is needed, you also need to know when and where you need the inventory. The fact is that, just like energy, inventory does not get destroyed but transforms from one type to another. And the decision is yours as when you want to transform it from Raw inventory to Work-in-Progress, to Finished-goods; or to decide when to bring it to your site, or move it to another location. These are tough decisions to make, with potentially big impacts on your supply chain. You see, inventory planning is based on a very large number of potential configurations of product types, locations, and timing based on demand and supply factors. So making good decisions about what to do with your inventory can be very complicated! But wait I am not done yet! On top of all these factors, you also have to worry about Acts-of-God, Mother-Nature and even "luck". Yes, luck! In our customer base, we have a major brewery with demand that swings heavily based on weather during the holiday weekends. We also know of a major food processing company in South Africa that is already planning for spikes in demand for "chicken" during the 2010 World Cup. Other examples, SARS in Asia caused shortages of high-tech semiconductor components, and H1N1 Vaccine was in serious shortage, just recently. .

So back to the question: How much, where and when? Most supply chains have many different layers of inventory or echelons. Examples are raw material, buffers in between sites, WIP, finished-goods, distribution centers, consignment locations and more. At any given time, for each layer of the supply chain, decisions need to be made regarding how much, and what type of inventory is needed to maximize your service levels, and minimize your cost. A simple question like that for even a few products can be complex, for hundreds or thousands of products can be mind-boggling, especially when you bring in chance and probability.

OK, here is the good news: MEIO. Multi Echelon Inventory Optimization is designed to do precisely what we have talked about, i.e. minimize your cost of reaching targeted service levels. MEIO deals with the elements of chance and probability at every layer of the supply chain and keeps a tight-eye on cost factors. It knows that Raw material costs a lot less than Finished-goods and has the potential to transform to what the market needs. In other words, MEIO takes into account postponement strategies and the potential to deliver a certain level of service. As the user specifies higher service levels, the system shows the potential increases in cost and recommends what to get, and where to keep it, in order to protect against surprises. It is really cool. And the good thing is that it will save you a significant amount of money in a short period of time.

So you owe it to your company to ask: Do we have enough of what it takes to deliver what we need? Are we losing money for keeping too much or losing opportunities, and market share, because we don't have enough? If you know the answer to these questions, do nothing and you are in great shape. If not, take a look at what MEIO can do for your company.

Inventory is GOOD only if there is the right amount, in the right place, at the right time! MEIO shows you what the "right" is for you.

Cyrus HadaviDr. K. Cyrus Hadavi is the president and CEO of Adexa, for more information about the author please click here.



For more information about different types of Supply Chain Planning systems visit: Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, or Sales and Operations Planning.


Topics: Multi Echelon Inventory Optimization, Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, MEIO, WIP, Finished Goods, Inventory Optimization

Run Your Supply Chain Like You Are Selling Diamonds!

Posted by Cyrus Hadavi on Tue, Mar 02, 2010

Demand Planning with AttributesI want to encourage you to plan and sell your products like Diamonds!

Allow me to elaborate. Diamonds are sold based on attributes, not product-ID (i.e. SKU-number). Nobody goes to a jeweler asking for a piece of rock, spends lots of money, and walks out of the store with a smile. Instead they ask for a diamond based on the 4C's (Carat, Color, Clarity, and Cut). So the bigger, brighter, cleaner and nicer cuts get priced higher and higher. As logical as this may seem, it amazes me to see how many manufacturers still sell their products like a commodity--giving away valuable things for free. And the root cause is usually the fact that their supply chain planning systems are not capable of handling attributes, in the first place. We see many manufacturers that don't utilize attributes when it comes to planning their supply chain and inventories, and yet work with a mind-boggling number of SKU's. Most of them also complain about high inventory costs, and poor customer service, too. Let's see why that is the case, and how attributes can apply to your products and supply chain-unless you manufacturer the first generation Model-T cars.

The fact is that just about everything has attributes, people do (e.g. kind, tall, smart), Products do (e.g. red, non-combustible, fast), machines do (e.g. speed, efficiency, precision), customers do (e.g. VIP, International, new), materials do (e.g. high surface tension, low grade, hazardous), countries do (e.g. tariffs, sanctioned, no-child labor), Logistics do (e.g. Rail only, Air Express, hazardous route), etc. etc. Adding attributes to all of these objects is not too hard; just add new fields to your data base.

What is important is the ability to plan with these attributes for your entire supply chain, beginning with demand planning, to operations and inventory planning. The ability to have an algebra by which attributes are used and planned with is critical in supply chain planning systems. Imagine having an inventory of sweaters without knowing how many of them are Large, Med, or Small, and how many of them are Red, Yellow, or Green. Clearly you could not make efficient use of this inventory, or forecast and build the right products. As mentioned, there are a lot more attributes than just style, size and color. The following is a typical scenario for a top-retailer:

"A NEW customer is interested in a NON-COMBUSTIBLE product made using a HIGH PRECISION machine, from SOUTHEAST ASIA region. Also, it can not be built in any country with CHILD LABOR, and can only be transported using RAIL or SEA."

Can you imagine having hundreds of customers, with thousands of products, and then trying to forecast and commit with so many different attributes involved. Don't forget, raw material and inventories also need to be planned with just as many attributes. In its full sense, Attribute-Based planning means the ability to take all the relevant product parameters into account when forecasting, planning, sourcing, selecting, pricing, promoting, differentiating, allocating, building, storing, committing, transporting, pegging and more. Without a planning system that considers the attributes, it would be impossible to do the math, plan the supply chain, and commit orders accurately. In fact, lack of attributes in the planning process causes some level of "commoditization," which reflects a company's inability to correctly distinguish its products from the others. In turn, customer requests are undermined, and products' costs and prices are not represented accurately. In most cases, this hurts the profitability of the enterprise in the long run, even if it has a monopoly over the market.

There are a lot more benefits to Attribute-Based planning. I highly recommend reading the more comprehensive ePaper that we just published on this topic: Attribute-Based Planning: How to Avoid Commoditization. Also, Feel free to comment on how you use attributes in your supply chain, or if you are looking for any ideas on how to make better use of attributes specific to your environment.

 

Dr. Cyrus HadaviDr. K. Cyrus Hadavi is the president and CEO of Adexa, for more information about the author please click here

 

 

For more information about different types of Supply Chain Planning systems visit: Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, or Sales and Operations Planning.

 


Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, Attribute Based Planning, Manufacturing Planning, Operations Planning, Differentiate

News: Semiconductor Leader Switches to Adexa SCP Systems

Posted by kameron hadavi on Tue, Jan 26, 2010

Semiconductor Supply Chain PlanningPress Release

Tuesday Jan. 26, 2010 

Los Angeles, CA., Adexa, Inc., the global provider of Supply Chain Planning and Performance Management solutions, announced today that Integrated Device Technology (NASDAQ: IDTI), a world-leader in semiconductor manufacturing for digital media, has selected and implemented Adexa's complete Supply Chain Planning suite of solutions, including demand planning, Available-to-Promise, Multi-Echelon Inventory Optimization (MEIO), operational planning, and plant planning.

"This initiative touched every major process running in our supply chain," Said Adhir Mattu, Vice President of Global Information Technology at IDT. "Our team initially focused on Adexa because it ran much faster than our previous supply chain systems, and was easier to use. But the biggest advantage ended up being their industry expertise and ability to leverage best-practices at all stages of this critical project."

IDT is currently maintaining and running all sales, marketing, and planning forecasts on the newly implemented solutions. Moreover, attribute-based planning capabilities are targeted towards further increasing the planning velocity.

"By replacing competing systems with Adexa, IDT bestowed a great deal of trust in us," said Cyrus Hadavi, President and CEO of Adexa. "This is yet another confirmation of our leadership in providing the most comprehensive and fastest solutions for our customers in this industry."

For full version of this press release click: http://www.adexa.com/news_events/default.asp?id=513

Contact us if you have any questions, click: info@adexa.com  

Topics: Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Inventory Planning, Announcements, Adexa, Multi-Echelon Inventory Planning

Retune your supply chain planning from JIT to Available-on-Demand

Posted by Cyrus Hadavi on Thu, Nov 12, 2009
demand planningHere is a question for you, is JIT a push-system or a pull-system? For decades you have been lead to believe that it is a "pull" system, but in fact you are "pushing" to make parts available, thinking that the resource will need it or use it. Just because the resource used the previous supply does not mean that it will use the next. In other words, the past is not necessarily an indication of the future. You may have already known that, and may argue that just filling buffer-zones is the best way to minimize inventory, especially if the buffers are not owned by your company.  However, you are just passing the responsibility of holding the supply to some other point in the supply chain, along with the associated cost-of-capital that goes with it. Naturally, the buffers need to be able to handle the largest tolerable demand surge.  So, if the past demand is more than the future, then inventory will sit there until it is needed or written-off. 

With that in mind, I think it's logical to say that a JIT system that looks at historical demand is really a push-system, but we want to do better than that.  We want to be able to look to the future in order to have a real pull-system.  At the end of the day, JIT is a cost-reduction system to keep up utilization and reduce inventory levels in a supply chain that has fairly steady demand.  What happens if the demand changes all of a sudden? What if red-widgets are more popular than green ones, today? How fast can you propagate the changes by resetting all of the buffers?  Undoing the buffers is like pushing the proverbial tooth paste back into the tube!  It will stay out until you finally use it, or wash it down the sink.  Of course as long as the supply chain is simple, with a linear flow, flat demand, and just a few constraints, fixed buffer-based inventory planning will still work well.  But it will also come down crashing if you have tens of different products sharing resources, constant changes in demand patterns, or supply lead-times.  These factors, and many others, change the production "rhythm" to the market.  Should the supply rhythm on a certain product be bang-bang-bang-bang, or would it be bang-----bang-----bang---.bang?  Which rhythm would generate the most revenue and profit while satisfying your customers?  

In the final analysis, JIT is a system of Available-on-Supply and it pushes based on a fixed rhythm associated to the speed of a machine or inventory availability. In that case, you better prey the historical demand does not change.  Why would you want to be held hostage by your supply?!  So what should we do if we want a system that is Available-on-Demand, that is more responsive to changes in the market place.  A system like this would change the "beat" and buffer-allocations based on the actual demand, and would be more attuned to the market-whether it be bang-bang--bang, or bang-bang...bang-bang-bang---bangbangbangbangbangbang--------bang.   For each product you would have a different "bang" profile.  The combination of all the profiles sets the rhythm for your entire supply chain.  Hence, when you put it all together, the result is a beautiful orchestration of drum-beats harmonized to the tune of the market demand.

To dynamically re-tune and reallocate material, capacity, and buffers is not easy but it's being done by many best-in-class companies out there.  You basically need two critical components, visibility and control of your supply chain.  That means visibility into your demand, inventory levels, and the ability to quickly control your production capacity, and suppliers' capabilities.  It is not a near sighted system that only looks at one level down the stream.  You must understand what needs to be done in all areas of the supply chain as the demand conditions change. To have this kind of control over your supply chain, it takes some reexamination of your processes and advanced technologies in the areas of Demand Planning, Multi-Echelon Inventory Optimization, Production Planning, and Performance Management.  Demand Planning will focus on making sure you are getting accurate demand signals from the market, MEIO will help you manage the right buffers for the expected demand, Production Planning will control your supply flow to those buffers, and Performance Management will give you dashboard like visibility over all of these critical points in your supply chain.  Again, I have said this many time before, but it's very hard to do this with spreadsheets and pure experience.  So take a little time to see how advanced technology can help you in one or more of these areas and you maybe surprised how quickly you can retune your supply chain from JIT to Available-on-Demand.  

If you are interested in this topic, I also suggest reading: How-to-Guide: Justify A Supply Chain Planning System, or feel free to contact us at any time.  

Cyrus HadaviDr. K. Cyrus Hadavi is the president and CEO of Adexa, for more information about the author please click here.

Topics: Supply Chain, Supply Chain Planning, Demand Planning, Supply Chain Performance Management, Inventory Planning, JIT, Adexa, Multi-Echelon Inventory Planning